Northwest Region

Case Pages:

Oil sheen, containment boom, and deflection boom in Starrigavan Bay on April 23, 2017. (Photo provided by the US Coast Guard)

Tug Powhatan

Oil Spill | Sitka, Alaska | April 19, 2017

Wild horses drinking at a stream in Oregon. (Bureau of Land Management)

Beaver Creek

Fuel Spill | Warm Springs Reservation, Oregon | March 1999

 

What Happened?

On March 4, 1999, an American Transport, Inc. tanker truck jackknifed on State Route 26. The truck spilled 5,388 gallons of unleaded gasoline onto the reservation of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Most of the spilled fuel flowed overland into Beaver Butte Creek just above its confluence with Beaver Creek, a tributary to the Warm Springs River.

Union Slough is a branch of the Snohomish River which feeds into Port Gardner Bay. These sloughs are critical to the survival of many species of salmonids.

Port Gardner

Hazardous Waste Site | Everett, Washington | Early 1900s to Present

Cutting through south Seattle, the Duwamish is an industrial river.

Lower Duwamish River

Hazardous Waste Site | Washington State | Mid-20th Century

What Happened?

The Duwamish River was once a wide, meandering river with large areas of mudflats and marshes. By the 1940s, channelization and filling had transformed the 9-mile estuary into a 5-mile industrial waterway. This process destroyed 97 percent of the original habitat.

Large woody debris in restored tributary to Whatcom Creek provides habitat for salmon.

Whatcom Creek

On June 10, 1999, a rupture in the Olympic Pipeline discharged approximately 236,000 gallons of gasoline into a tributary of Whatcom Creek. Fumes from the gasoline ignited as it moved down Whatcom Creek, through a city park and residential neighborhoods.

Juvenile Chinook salmon.

Portland Harbor

Since the early 1900s, numerous facilities have released oil, PCBs polychlorinated biphenyls; a class of chemicals previously used in manufacturing that remain in the environment for many decades, accumulate in living creatures, and pose health hazards to humans, wildlife, and fish., heavy metals, pesticides, and other hazardous substances into Portland Harbor.

Aerial view of Eagle Harbor.

Eagle Harbor

Hazardous Waste Site | Bainbridge Island, WA | Early 1900s to Present

Hazardous substances were released from the Wyckoff Company wood treatment facility and a shipyard beginning early in the 20th century. Released contaminants included PAHs, mercury, and heavy metals.

Articles:

Sarah Allen assesses injuries to natural resources from her post in Alaska.

Meet Toxicologist Sarah Allan from Alaska

This is an excerpt from a monthly series profiling scientists and technicians who provide exemplary contributions to the mission of NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R). This month's profile is on Assessment and Restoration Division toxicologist and Alaska Regional Resource Coordinator, Sarah Allan.

Measuring a young Chinook salmon, part of the ongoing natural resources damage assessment at the Portland Harbor site. (NOAA photo)

NOAA Seeks Public Comment on Addendum to Natural Resource Assessment Plan for Portland Harbor

NOAA and other Trustee Council members have been conducting a natural resources damage assessment since 2010 for the Portland Harbor Superfund site in Portland, Oregon, to evaluate natural resource injuries incurred over time in areas contaminated with hazardous substances (pesticides such as DDT, PCBs, and others), and oil.

Caption: (l - r) Rebecca Hoff, Jason Lehto, Laurel Jennings, Debra Salstrom, Tom Elliott, and Dr. David Pyke (NOAA Photo)

Understanding Habitat Recovery Time for Restoration Planning in Washington State

Five NOAA scientists recently led a group of more than 40 trustees in a multi-day restoration planning exercise related to the Hanford Nuclear Site. The event took place in Richland, Washington, and increased scientific convergence about habitat recovery time after restoration actions are completed in an affected area.

(l - r ) Megan Callahan Grant, Restoration Center, NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation (Portland), Bill Duggan, Robinwood Riverie Homeowners Association, Nicole LeBoeuf, NOAA National Ocean Service,  Gary Howard, Columbia Restoration Group, and Bobby Proutt, Falling Springs. NOAA photo.

Fish and Wildlife Gain Critical Habitat Near Portland Harbor

National Ocean Service Deputy Assistant Administrator Nicole LeBoeuf met February 7, 2018, with key partners of the Rinearson Creek Restoration project in Gladstone, Oregon. The 33-acre restoration area is being created to bring back riparian, off-channel, and upland habitats for Chinook salmon, lamprey, bald eagle, river otter, and mink, as well as several important amphibian species.

(l - r) RADM Tim Gallaudet, assistant secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and acting under secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere; Kurt Nelson, fish and water resources scientist, the Tulalip Tribes; Rebecca Hoff, NOAA environmental scientist and regional resource coordinator; Jennifer Steger, NOAA Restoration Center, regional supervisor. NOAA photo.

Washington Project Showcased to New NOAA Leader: Restoration Benefits Fish, Wildlife, and Local Communities

RADM Tim Gallaudet, acting under secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere, toured the Qwuloolt Estuary restoration project in Marysville, Washington, on January 26, 2018, to see an example of NOAA’s Damage Assessment Remediation and Restoration Program (DARRP) success.

$4 million Settlement Reached to Help NOAA Restore Port Gardner and Snohomish River Habitat

The U.S. Department of Justice announced a $4 million settlement that will fund some of NOAA’s restoration of sites damaged by industrial pollution in Port Gardner Bay and the Snohomish River in Washington state.

Basic pages:

A black-necked Stilt and Snowy Egrets in restored wetland habitat. Photo provided courtesy of Chevron.

Contact Us

Contact us for more information about the Damage Assessment, Remediation, and Restoration Program.