Malone Service Company

Oil pits dominated the Malone site prior to the cleanup.
Oil pits dominated the Malone site prior to the cleanup.

Upon implementation, the projects selected in the Final Restoration Plan will make the public whole for the natural resources damaged at the Malone site. While each project is outstanding in its own right, together, these projects leverage previous and ongoing restoration efforts by restoration partners and will contribute to landscape scale restoration in Galveston Bay.

Jamie Schubert
NOAA Restoration Center

Contacts

Jamie Schubert
NOAA Restoration Center
4700 Avenue U
Galveston, Texas  77551
(409) 621-1248
Jamie.Schubert@noaa.gov

Case Documents

Malone Service Company

Hazardous Waste Site | Texas City, Texas | 1964 – 1997

 

What Happened?

From 1964 to 1997, on the shores of Swan Lake and Galveston Bay, the Malone Services Company operated a reclamation, storage and disposal facility for waste oils, chemicals, and hazardous wastes. During its operation, hundreds of businesses sent more than 480 million gallons of organic and inorganic waste to the facility. Wastes were stored in two earthen, unlined pits which released contaminants to the groundwater within the site, and runoff into surface waters. Designated a [qtip:Superfund site|An uncontrolled or abandoned place where hazardous waste is located, possibly affecting local ecosystems or people. Sites are listed on the National Priorities List for evaluation and cleanup by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.] in 2001, cleanup activities began here in 2014, and are ongoing.

 

What Were the Impacts?

Natural resources and natural resource services associated with upland-woodlands habitat, freshwater marsh habitat, and saltwater marsh habitat around the 150-acre site were injured by these hazardous substance releases.

Galveston Bay is the 7th largest estuary in the United States. It is also part of the National Estuary Program, which promotes and protects the nation’s most sensitive coastal ecosystems. The surface waters of Swan Lake and the surrounding wetlands are home to commercial and recreational fisheries, as well as endangered species of sea turtles. The area provides fishery habitat for spawning and rearing, as well as for feeding and migration for adult fish.

 

What’s Happening Now?

In September 2012, NOAA, the State of Texas, and federal [qtip:Trustees|Government officials acting on behalf of the public when there is injury to, destruction of, loss of, or threat to natural resources.], reached a settlement with the 27 [qtip:responsible parties|The individuals, companies, or government agencies responsible for an oil spill, hazardous substance release, or ship grounding incident.]. The majority of the approximately $3.1 million will be used to fund restoration.

In July 2015, the Trustees finalized the damage assessment and restoration plan. The plan includes:

  • restoring 25 acres of freshwater wetlands in Campbell Bayou 
  • restoring three acres of terrestrial woodlands in the Virginia Peninsula Preserve
  • constructing 70 acres of intertidal saltwater wetlands in Pierce Marsh.

The Trustees are currently working with project partners (including the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Galveston Bay Foundation, Ducks Unlimited and SCENIC Galveston) to implement the restoration projects.

Last updated June 22, 2016